Learn to fight back against the food giants

February 20th, 2014

There’s just one week until Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist Michael Moss will be in Winnipeg. Discover the tactics multi-national companies use to get you to eat processed food – and learn the how to fight back.

 

“Knowing everything that the food companies are doing to get you to do their bidding when you walk in the front door of a grocery store is an incredible playing field leveler.” –Michael Moss

 

Michael Moss discusses
Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us

Thursday, Feb. 27 at 7:30 p.m.
Masonic Centre, 420 Corydon Avenue
(at Confusion Corner)

Tickets are $30, or $15 for Growing Local Conference attendees

To purchase tickets go to www.wpgfdn.org/michaelmoss.

The evening includes a public lecture/presentation and Q&A session.
In his book Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us, Moss details the rise of the processed food industry and its link to the North American obesity epidemic. And he reveals how companies use salt, sugar and fat to allure us.

The Winnipeg Foundation, in partnership with Food Matters Manitoba, is pleased to present Michael Moss as part of the Growing Local Conference.

Why is The Winnipeg Foundation co-presenting Michael Moss? We want Winnipeg to be a place where community life flourishes – today and for future generations. To do that, the Foundation identifies and responds to the changing needs of our community. One of the areas we fund is food-related programs, and in 2011 we launched Nourishing Potential, a program helping kids access healthy food, cooking skills and nutrition education needed to grow and thrive.

To have a healthy community, you need healthy people – Nourishing Potential is one way we’re helping children and youth. Michael Moss’ presentation will help all Winnipeggers understand what they’re up against each time they go grocery shopping or stop for a snack, giving them the power to make healthier choices.

Make a sandwich, be a star

February 13th, 2014

There’s one month left to get kids cooking for a chance to win!

The Recipe for Success Video Cooking Contest aims to nourish the potential of Winnipeg kids by asking them to create their most outrageous, nutritious and delicious sandwich and share it on video.

Entering is easy!

  • Grab a group of two to four kids in Grades 4-6.
  • Make a three minute (or less) video demonstrating how to make your sandwich.
  • Submit your video by March 14.
  • Rally your friends to vote for your video during the public voting time, March 17 to 28.

The contest is open to residents of Winnipeg.

Need more help?
Plan a great sandwich video is an overview outlining some steps you might want to consider when preparing your video. Or check out the Recipe for Success Contest website for more great tips.

The more creative the sandwich, the better. White bread need not apply – the contest is hoping to see wraps, pitas, and even lettuce.

The Winner and Runner-up teams will be determined by a panel of judges, and the People’s Choice team will be decided by the online public votes. In addition, two teams will win based on a wild card draw.

Up for grabs…

Why is the Foundation spearheading this initiative?
We believe sometimes a sandwich isn’t just a sandwich – it’s a building block for a brighter future. The Foundation identifies and responds to the changing needs of our community. One of the areas we fund is food-related programs and in 2011 we launched the Nourishing Potential Fund, which helps children and youth in after-school and drop-in programs access the healthy food, nutrition education and cooking skills development they need to grow and thrive.

We’re currently growing the Nourishing Potential Fund, aimed to be a $5 million endowment which will provide more than $200,000 every year for related programs. The Recipe for Success Video Cooking Contest is being held in support of Nourishing Potential.

Visit www.wpgfdn.org/recipe-for-success for complete contest details.

Fight back against food giants that lure you to “do their bidding”

February 5th, 2014

How do you fight back against the food giants that do everything in their power to get you to eat their products? According to Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist Michael Moss, you educate.

“Knowing everything that the food companies are doing to get you to do their bidding when you walk in the front door of a grocery store is an incredible playing field leveler.” – Michael Moss

Chelsea McCallum and Shay Harris, participants in an Inner City Youth Alive program that received a Nourishing Potential grant.

The Winning Foundation takes that message to heart. We want Winnipeg to be a place where community life flourishes – today and for future generations. To do that, we identify and respond to the changing needs of our community. One of the areas we fund is food-related programs, and in 2011 we launched Nourishing Potential, a program which helps kids access healthy food, cooking skills and nutrition education needed to grow and thrive.

To have a healthy community, you need healthy people –Nourishing Potential is one way we’re helping children and youth. But it’s important for everyone to understand not only why it’s important to eat well but also why doing so can often be difficult. That’s where Michael Moss comes in.

In his book Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us, Moss outlines what you and I are up against every time we go grocery shopping or stop for a snack. The Winnipeg Foundation, in partnership with Food Matters Manitoba, is pleased to present Michael Moss on Thursday, Feb. 27 as part of the Growing Local Conference.

Here’s your chance to discover the tactics multi-national companies use to get you to eat processed foods, a $3 trillion a year industry. In the book, Moss outlines the rise of the processed food industry and its link to the North American obesity epidemic. He reveals how companies use salt, sugar and fat to allure us and, more importantly, how we can fight back.

The evening includes a public lecture and Q&A session with Moss on Thursday, February 27, starting at 7:30 p.m. at the Masonic Centre, 420 Corydon Avenue (at Confusion Corner). Tickets are $30, or $15 for Growing Local Conference attendees. The venue is fully accessible.

For more information and to purchase tickets online go to www.wpgfdn.org/michaelmoss.

A Catch Twenty-Something: Young adults and the work experience dilemma

November 20th, 2013

Many young professionals and post-secondary students find themselves in a similar situation: they don’t have the professional experience to get a job, but they can’t get the experience without one.

Enter the Emerging Leaders’ Fellowship (ELF) to provide opportunities that work to address this dilemma for 18 to 35 year-olds. It’s an initiative of The Winnipeg Foundation created to encourage this demographic to learn more about the charitable sector through hands-on experience.

Fellowship applicants propose one major project over which they can take ownership, working in partnership with a local charitable agency. As they increase their understanding of community issues, they directly benefit the community through their work at the selected agency.

“[Our fellow] brings her background, experience and a different generational perspective and way of thinking to what we do; she is helping us to step out of our patterns, to imagine, to think of new possibilities for our work.” said Viola Prowse, Executive Director of the Child Nutrition Council of Manitoba (CNCM).

CNCM is the first partner agency to participate in the ELF program. In spring 2013 ELF fellow, Emma Fieldhouse, 23, proposed her project, Capturing Community Wealth for Kids’ Health, to the organization and was approved for a fellowship grant from The Winnipeg Foundation to implement it. This was the first intake for the program. For more on the project, click here.

Left to right: Viola Prowse, Executive Director of the Child Nutrition Council of Manitoba (CNCM) with Emma Fieldhouse, whose project was the first to obtain an Emerging Leaders' Fellowship (ELF) grant.

ELF is providing much-needed opportunities in the community by establishing important staffing resources and building new relationships in the charitable sector. Young professionals and post-secondary students gain valuable work experience by designing and implementing a project with a partner agency, and this opportunity will help successful applicants to prepare for future career possibilities.

In the first few months of her year-long project, Fieldhouse indicates she is already developing a unique knowledge base on the inner-workings of non-profit, and she feels this will be useful to her in her future professional endeavours.

“[Through ELF] I am getting to experience things that I haven’t yet in my academic or other work-related experience. I am really looking forward to the rest of the year.” she said.

If you or someone you know may be interested in applying, please click here for program information and downloads. The second intake of the program has begun; applications are due December 2nd, 2013.

Written by Joanna Fultz, The Winnipeg Foundation’s Youth Engagement & Community Grants Coordinator

Youth, Philanthropy and Our City

October 31st, 2013

What does it look like when 400 community minded, local youth get together to talk about community development with 40 community leaders? It looks a little like the Youth in Philanthropy Fall Conference.

Started in 1999 the Youth in Philanthropy (YiP) Program works towards getting local youth involved in community development. The program consists of 29 committees, comprised of 27 high schools and 2 community organizations. Each committee receives $5,000 from The Winnipeg Foundation to grant into the community.

Throughout the YiP year, these youth-led committees are responsible for identifying which organizations will receive grants, how much each organization will receive, and how those dollars are to be used.

Summer interns 2013

The Fall Conference is the kick-off to the year. It is the first time when all the committees will be together in the same room and their first exposure to some of the local issues that the city is facing. In other words, the Conference is the prime opportunity to find out what (and who) YiP is all about. These 400 students from across the city come together to talk community, and to listen to what the experts have to say about pressing city issues; what YiP and Summer Internship Program (SIP) alumni have to say about how philanthropy helped them to form their paths; and how new initiatives like the Young Philanthropists’ Network (YPN) continue to pave the way for young people interested in community development.

Each of the over 35 speakers from over 28 different community organizations and businesses will come to discuss the areas of interest identified by the different youth voices on each committee. The topics span the spectrum from social justice to environment, to citizen journalism and artistic expression. Each committee member is able to choose their sessions as they fit with their interests. This means that there are over 400 young minds learning about anything from the impact we have on the environment, to what they could do with YiP and their education after high school. There is even a special session for the staff advisors of each committee to sit and discuss best practices for keeping young people interested and involved in community development.

2013 Summer interns during site visit at the Winnipeg Art Gallery.

The best part of the YiP Conference is that it’s all local, youth-oriented, and accessible to anyone in the YiP program. It is an honest look into our community brought to you by the people who know it best. In a city like Winnipeg where there is a lot going on, the YiP Fall Conference gives local youth the opportunity to learn about things they never thought possible. YiPee!

 

Written by Tolu Ilelaboye, The Winnipeg Foundation’s Youth in Philanthropy Convener